Travel Mat

Uncategorized

Made something a little special for Odie Sanchez today. 
Odie hates sitting on the ground unless he has something comfy under his fluffy butt. 

This little mat rolls up so you can take it anywhere. It’s also rad for when you don’t want dog hair on your car seat cover. 

Get one for your pooch for $20.

Sausageandsanchez@gmail.com

#SausageAndSanchez

   
    
 

Advertisements

NBN NEWS helps promote foster puppies

Animal Welfare League of Qld, Media, Medical, pet care, Uncategorized

Today I caught up with NBN news to talk about the importance of desexing your pet. As the weather heats up shelters are inundated with with litters of kittens and puppies from unplanned pregnancies.
Australia has one of the highest rates of pet ownership in the world. Four out of five Australians have owned a pet and almost two-thirds of Australian households currently own pets. Despite these figures, around 23 cats and dogs die every hour of every day in pounds and shelters nationwide. Due to the ongoing problem of pet overpopulation, these healthy, loving animals are being killed because there are not enough homes available. Desexing helps put a stop to this statistic.

VIEW THE NBN NEWS CLIP HERE

Keeping warm with Hans Sausage

adventures of S&S, animal welfare, Animal Welfare League of Qld, Hans Sausage, Uncategorized

Hans here,

You know as the weather cools down I like to make little burrows in mums bed and snooze the day away. But today I got dragged to the office to keep the breadwinner company so I insisted on wearing something fabulous!

I scored this beauty from the AWLQ Op Shop today and boy does it keep me toasty.. So to all those chilly dogs out there I say visit an op shop and keep your wiener warm! There are so many bargains to be found!

Love and licks

Hans Sausage x

20140722-183624-66984113.jpg

Odie Sanchez – Winter Fashion

adventures of S&S, Odie Sanchez, SHOP, Uncategorized

Odie is a true Mexican. He loves a good siesta and loves the heat.10472781_1491319167752421_1318765175_o

In the middle of Summer you can find him under a doona, blanket or pile of towels. When the door bell rings he doesn’t get up but rather barks from under the covers. All you can see is a blanket bouncing up and down insisting you make all the raquet stop because he of course is trying to catch some ZZzzZZZzz’s.

Odie is the master of hide and seek which will probably be his downfall one day because I flop on the couch and usually find him squashed under a blanket buried beneath the sofa cushions.

Introducing Ruby Sausage

Uncategorized

It was like finding a needle in a haystack. After adopting Hans Sausage I decided that if a little girl, under a year old was surrendered to the shelter that she would be the dog for me. Dachshunds have come and gone the majority little boys. Two years later I met Ruby. And she was definitely worth the wait. This 6 month old was surrendered for chasing the cat, chewing furniture and because she wasn’t toilet trained.. All traits typical in a curious dachshund. I brought her home to meet S&S and it was decided she was going to be ours.. She has been in our life for three weeks now and now knows how to sit, shake paws and is 99% toilet trained.

Patience is a virtue – pets are for life

We are in love

Welcome to the S&S wolf pack cutie

20140523-184920.jpg

20140523-184939.jpg

20140523-184853.jpg

How much would you pay to save a life?

Animal Welfare League of Qld, Uncategorized

I don’t know about you but my pets are priceless. They are my family and bring me endless love and laughter. For the pets at the Animal Welfare League Qld though there are 170 animals without owners patiently waiting for their new life to start.

With more than 700 animals waiting in foster care and in community vet clinics it is suffice to say that the shelter is bursting. That’s why for this weekend only (12th & 13th APRIL) they are letting the community and potential adopters name the adoption price on cats and dogs they would like to adopt.

So how much would you pay to save the life of an animal?

Help the AWLQ save a life today – to view animals available for adoption CLICK HERE

Ezy Dog – CLICK CLACK front and … bark?

adventures of S&S, Hans Sausage, Notes from S&S, pet care, Uncategorized

So if you have been following Sausage & Sanchez for a little while now you will know that I like to make coats and accessories for Odie Sanchez & Hans Sausage. I have also been honoured and lucky enough to make coats, bandanas, bags and toys for lots of Dachshunds, Chihuahua’s and small breed dogs all over Australia! There is one thing I am yet to master though throughout all of my tinkering and that is HARNESS’S.

Odie & Hans come just about everywhere with me. Shopping, to CrossFit, even to work! In order to keep the little rascals safe I found a travel car harness to avoid them bouncing all over the place while I am trying to drive.

I have purchased these contraptions many times and while Odie sits tight and puts up with not being able to sit on my lap Hans Sausage, (with his annoying Daxie determination) has chewed through many a harness and is back on my lap in record speed.

So I decided to try an Ezy Dog Harness with Car Restraint These bad boys had him sitting pretty and he is yet to escape! WIN!chestplate-diagram2.jpg

The Car Harness can also be used for general walking by attaching a lead.

It is Industry Award Winning which pretty much says it all. The unique molded chest plate I learned even forms to your dogs chest creating a custom fit.

It also rides lower on Han’s chest which apparently disperses his weight so it is easier to walk him. As you can see Odie was very unimpressed when he didn’t receive one so back to the shop I went for his own tough guy chest plate.

hansOdie demanded a badass harness to keep up with his tough guy rep

1977331_10152290578918308_837087395_n

Hans is now getting to visit the CrossFit Box again since he is able to travel safely.

998922_10152295521578308_1745453733_nKeeping your animal safe in your car is very important. In QLD drivers can be issued a $256 fine for driving with an animal on their lap so do yourself and your pet a favour and get a car restraint.

The Queensland Road Rules (QRR) do not specifically require an animal to be restrained while travelling inside a vehicle.  In other words, carrying an unrestrained dog inside a vehicle is not an offence.

However, section 297 of the QRR provides that a driver must not drive a vehicle unless they have proper control of the vehicle, and also that a vehicle must not be driven if an animal is in the driver’s lap. An offence under this section carries a fine of $256 and a maximum court penalty of $2,200.

While there is no legal requirement to restrain a dog that is travelling inside a vehicle, the Department of Transport and Main Roads recommends that all animals should be restrained in some way to ensure the safety and welfare of all occupants of the vehicle and of the animal itself.

– See more at: http://www.woodles.com.au/blog/dogs/dog-restraints-in-cars-is-it-legal-queensland-transport-rules/#sthash.EnRDrRiN.dpuf

The Queensland Road Rules (QRR) do not specifically require an animal to be restrained while travelling inside a vehicle.  In other words, carrying an unrestrained dog inside a vehicle is not an offence.

However, section 297 of the QRR provides that a driver must not drive a vehicle unless they have proper control of the vehicle, and also that a vehicle must not be driven if an animal is in the driver’s lap. An offence under this section carries a fine of $256 and a maximum court penalty of $2,200.

While there is no legal requirement to restrain a dog that is travelling inside a vehicle, the Department of Transport and Main Roads recommends that all animals should be restrained in some way to ensure the safety and welfare of all occupants of the vehicle and of the animal itself.

– See more at: http://www.woodles.com.au/blog/dogs/dog-restraints-in-cars-is-it-legal-queensland-transport-rules/#sthash.EnRDrRiN.dpuf

My Pal Chester

animal welfare, Animal Welfare League of Qld, Uncategorized

Working in an animal shelter means I am lucky enough to play a small part in the rehoming of thousands of animals each year. in 2013 the AWLQ rehomed over 5000 animals and every one of those beuaitful animals had a story to tell.

On Boxing day 2013 one such animal arrived at the AWLQ with a HUGE story to tell. That dogs name was Chester.

Nine month old Chester arrived with an abnomality to his front legs. He was in good condition but it was clear that he had been born with out fully developed front legs which meant as he grew walking would become more difficult.

It was decided as we spent more time with him that he was going to need  a wheelchair to help him get around more easily.
860737-d010822c-a8e2-11e3-9dd3-54db44ed2f71
The cost of the wheelchair was $1000 and we put the call out to our social media supporters to ask for their help to cover the cost of his chair.  Remarkably within half an hour we had raised the money and Chester’s chair was on its way.

When the chair arrived from the USA Chester was fitted and with the help of vet nurses he took his first steps. While he was a little wobbly at first he slowly got the feel for it and with a little help from our vet staff he was walking slowly but surely.

Chester’s story has been an amazing example of the kindness and compassion of the community. From his foster carer to our community of online donators,  Chester’s story has touched everyone in a very special way.

In the past fortnight I have been lucky enough to promote the kindness shown to Chester and to highlight the importance of giving dogs like Chester a second chance to a national audience.

Chester and I have appeared on the:

Courier Mail
Channel 10’s The Project
Channel 7’s Sunrise
Nine News
Albert & Logan News
Totally Wild

Chester is getting stronger by the day and soon it will come time to find his forever home. I am so honoured to have met such a charasmatic little dog and I am so looking forwrd to introducing him to his forever family.

Chester and I on Channel 7 Sunrise program

1489002_10152302062523308_540917729_n
Behind the scenes at our Sunrise shoot1604779_10152302863553308_1563136787_n
At the Channel 10 Studios for The Project cross

1795594_10152291447053308_631905589_n

 

Rhino V’s Stick

Medical, Uncategorized

Who doesn’t love a game of fetch? Whether it be with a frisbee, ball or stick. Rhino our favourite Staffy is a huge fan of fetch but recently found himself at the vet after catching a stick which was then lodged in his throat!

Vet’s are working hard to educate pet owners about the dangers of sticks as it becomes an increasingly common case. In Summer when people are spending more time outdoors with their pet injuries can occur when a dog runs onto a stick in the ground, forcing it down their throat and cutting under the tongue or even tearing the gullet further back.

But this isn’t the only injury. Below are other injuries throwing sticks can have.

Eye: There is direct damage to the eye. If the force of the penetration is great enough, the stick can result in damage to your dog’s brain, too.

Mouth: Stick penetration in the mouth can damage a lot of important structures, including the tongue, laryngeal and pharyngeal tissues, palate (“roof”) of the mouth, teeth, esophagus, and trachea. These traumas can also damage the nerves or blood vessels within your dog’s neck, and, depending on the direction the stick takes, there can be significant damage to your dog’s sinuses or brain.

Chest: As you might imagine, with all of the important structures that are present within the chest cavity, the damage that a stick penetration in this area can be severe. Along with the heart and lungs, the chest also houses many large blood vessels and important nerves, as well as the diaphragm, trachea, and esophagus.

Abdomen: Stick penetration in this area can easily result in damage to multiple important organs. Commonly affected organs include the stomach, liver, spleen, and intestines.

To make matters worse, the initial damage caused by the penetration of the stick isn’t always indicative of the full extent of a dog’s injuries. Despite best efforts, it’s often possible for small fragments or splinters of wood to be missed during initial surgical exploration of such puncture wounds, because sticks shatter and splinter upon impact. Wood itself doesn’t necessarily show up on X-rays, especially small splinters of wood.

We went to visit Rhino after his ordeal and brought him a Purina Chew Squeaky Stick. We know he will love it when he is all better which after a couple of weeks rest

20140105-132600.jpg

Rhino after his operation1493147_10152039543392107_2007231154_n

Rhino’s brother and sister (Tank and Peach who are both rescue dogs) spent time chilling out in the cool while Rhino got better.

1546059_10151793916982273_1674776630_n